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What to eat before & After Gastric Sleeve Surgery

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Pre-surgery Diet

Shrinking your liver is important for the safety of your surgery procedure.

If you’re obese, your liver most likely has an accumulation of fat cells both in and around it. This makes it larger than it should be. Your liver is located right next to your stomach. A too-large liver makes gastric sleeve surgery harder for your doctor to do, and more dangerous for you to have done.

[Copied] To prepare for the procedure, you’ll be given a specific diet to follow, beginning two weeks before your scheduled surgery date. It’s a strict diet that reduces calories as well as carbohydrates, such as sweets, potatoes, and pasta. You will eat primarily lean protein, vegetables, and low- or no-calorie fluids. Your doctor may give you a caloric goal to stick to daily.

Two days prior to surgery, you will switch to a clear, liquid diet. This may include one no-sugar protein shake daily, in addition to broth, water, decaffeinated coffee or tea, Jell-O, and sugar-free popsicles. Caffeinated and carbonated beverages should be avoided. [/Copied]

Post-Surgery Diet

Following your surgery you’ll continue with the same clear liquid diet you followed in the days leading up to surgery. Avoid sugar, caffein & carbonated drinks, which can all cause postoperative complications such as; bowel obstruction, gastric leakage, diarrhea, constipation, and dehydration. You should be able to resume a normal solid food diet after six weeks.

 

Week 1

Following your surgery you’ll continue with the same clear liquid diet you followed in the days leading up to surgery.

Avoid sugar, caffein & carbonated drinks, which can all cause postoperative complications such as; bowel obstruction, gastric leakage, diarrhea, constipation, and dehydration.

[copied]

For the first week after the procedure, you’ll continue with the same clear liquid diet you followed in the days leading up to surgery. This will help to avoid postoperative complications, including bowel obstruction, gastric leakage, diarrhea, constipation, and dehydration. Your body needs time to heal, and this regimen will help with that goal. Tips to keep in mind include:

  • Make sure to drink plenty of clear liquids. If you have trouble remaining hydrated, talk to your doctor about electrolyte drinks to try, such as low-calorie Gatorade.
  • Don’t drink anything with sugar. Sugar can contribute to dumping syndrome, a complication caused by too much sugar entering the small intestine quickly. This results in severe nausea, fatigue, diarrhea, and even vomiting. Sugar is also full of empty calories. It should be avoided now and minimized in the long term.
  • Caffeine may contribute to acid reflux and dehydration, and should also be avoided.
  • Carbonated beverages, including those with sugar, no-calorie options, and seltzer, can all contribute to gas and bloating. These should all be avoided postoperatively and possibly even long term.

Week 2

Following your surgery you’ll continue with the same clear liquid diet you followed in the days leading up to surgery.

Avoid sugar, caffein & carbonated drinks, which can all cause postoperative complications such as; bowel obstruction, gastric leakage, diarrhea, constipation, and dehydration.

[copied]

For the first week after the procedure, you’ll continue with the same clear liquid diet you followed in the days leading up to surgery. This will help to avoid postoperative complications, including bowel obstruction, gastric leakage, diarrhea, constipation, and dehydration. Your body needs time to heal, and this regimen will help with that goal. Tips to keep in mind include:

  • Make sure to drink plenty of clear liquids. If you have trouble remaining hydrated, talk to your doctor about electrolyte drinks to try, such as low-calorie Gatorade.
  • Don’t drink anything with sugar. Sugar can contribute to dumping syndrome, a complication caused by too much sugar entering the small intestine quickly. This results in severe nausea, fatigue, diarrhea, and even vomiting. Sugar is also full of empty calories. It should be avoided now and minimized in the long term.
  • Caffeine may contribute to acid reflux and dehydration, and should also be avoided.
  • Carbonated beverages, including those with sugar, no-calorie options, and seltzer, can all contribute to gas and bloating. These should all be avoided postoperatively and possibly even long term.

Week 3

Following your surgery you’ll continue with the same clear liquid diet you followed in the days leading up to surgery.

Following your surgery you’ll continue with the same clear liquid diet you followed in the days leading up to surgery. Avoid sugar, caffein & carbonated drinks, which can all cause postoperative complications such as; bowel obstruction, gastric leakage, diarrhea, constipation, and dehydration.

[copied]

For the first week after the procedure, you’ll continue with the same clear liquid diet you followed in the days leading up to surgery. This will help to avoid postoperative complications, including bowel obstruction, gastric leakage, diarrhea, constipation, and dehydration. Your body needs time to heal, and this regimen will help with that goal. Tips to keep in mind include:

  • Make sure to drink plenty of clear liquids. If you have trouble remaining hydrated, talk to your doctor about electrolyte drinks to try, such as low-calorie Gatorade.
  • Don’t drink anything with sugar. Sugar can contribute to dumping syndrome, a complication caused by too much sugar entering the small intestine quickly. This results in severe nausea, fatigue, diarrhea, and even vomiting. Sugar is also full of empty calories. It should be avoided now and minimized in the long term.
  • Caffeine may contribute to acid reflux and dehydration, and should also be avoided.
  • Carbonated beverages, including those with sugar, no-calorie options, and seltzer, can all contribute to gas and bloating. These should all be avoided postoperatively and possibly even long term.

Week 4

Following your surgery you’ll continue with the same clear liquid diet you followed in the days leading up to surgery.

Following your surgery you’ll continue with the same clear liquid diet you followed in the days leading up to surgery. Avoid sugar, caffein & carbonated drinks, which can all cause postoperative complications such as; bowel obstruction, gastric leakage, diarrhea, constipation, and dehydration.

[copied]

For the first week after the procedure, you’ll continue with the same clear liquid diet you followed in the days leading up to surgery. This will help to avoid postoperative complications, including bowel obstruction, gastric leakage, diarrhea, constipation, and dehydration. Your body needs time to heal, and this regimen will help with that goal. Tips to keep in mind include:

  • Make sure to drink plenty of clear liquids. If you have trouble remaining hydrated, talk to your doctor about electrolyte drinks to try, such as low-calorie Gatorade.
  • Don’t drink anything with sugar. Sugar can contribute to dumping syndrome, a complication caused by too much sugar entering the small intestine quickly. This results in severe nausea, fatigue, diarrhea, and even vomiting. Sugar is also full of empty calories. It should be avoided now and minimized in the long term.
  • Caffeine may contribute to acid reflux and dehydration, and should also be avoided.
  • Carbonated beverages, including those with sugar, no-calorie options, and seltzer, can all contribute to gas and bloating. These should all be avoided postoperatively and possibly even long term.

1 Month +

Diet after your first month

Following your surgery you’ll continue with the same clear liquid diet you followed in the days leading up to surgery. Avoid sugar, caffein & carbonated drinks, which can all cause postoperative complications such as; bowel obstruction, gastric leakage, diarrhea, constipation, and dehydration.

[copied]

For the first week after the procedure, you’ll continue with the same clear liquid diet you followed in the days leading up to surgery. This will help to avoid postoperative complications, including bowel obstruction, gastric leakage, diarrhea, constipation, and dehydration. Your body needs time to heal, and this regimen will help with that goal. Tips to keep in mind include:

  • Make sure to drink plenty of clear liquids. If you have trouble remaining hydrated, talk to your doctor about electrolyte drinks to try, such as low-calorie Gatorade.
  • Don’t drink anything with sugar. Sugar can contribute to dumping syndrome, a complication caused by too much sugar entering the small intestine quickly. This results in severe nausea, fatigue, diarrhea, and even vomiting. Sugar is also full of empty calories. It should be avoided now and minimized in the long term.
  • Caffeine may contribute to acid reflux and dehydration, and should also be avoided.
  • Carbonated beverages, including those with sugar, no-calorie options, and seltzer, can all contribute to gas and bloating. These should all be avoided postoperatively and possibly even long term.